Derek J. PenslarJews and the Military: A History

Princeton University Press, 2013

by Jason Schulman on October 1, 2015

Derek J. Penslar

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In Jews and the Military: A History (Princeton University Press, 2015), Derek J. Penslar, the Stanley Lewis Professor of Israel Studies at the University of Oxford and the Samuel Zacks Professor of Jewish History at the University of Toronto, explores the expansive but largely forgotten story of Jews in modern military service.

Over more than three centuries, millions of Jews have joined, voluntarily and not, the military of their home country.  Military service offered an opportunity to demonstrate masculine pride, to show worthiness for emancipation, or for upward mobility.  The history of Jewish military service sheds light on the experience of Jews and power in the modern world.

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